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Deloitte turns EHR reservoir into health outcomes tool

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Deloitte has given the first indication of how it will tap into the decades of electronic health records (EHRs) at its new partner Intermountain Healthcare. The first product of the 5-year alliance uses the repository of EHRs to support analysis around patient and product outcomes.

Attendees at DIA 2013 were given a first look at the software, called OutcomesMiner, last week. In a press release to unveil the product, Deloitte pitched OutcomesMiner as a tool to help the industry meet the new demands of payers. Users can access the health outcomes associated with a drug and then dig down into the results for certain phenotypes, specific medical associations and other subpopulations. The data is double-blinded to protect patient privacy.

As well as enabling retrospective analysis, OutcomesMiner is set up to support follow-up studies. Tools for comparative effectiveness, as well as health economic and outcomes research, are built into the platform. Deloitte will now work to show its client base--which it says includes most of the top 15 pharma companies--how these tools can help demonstrate the value of their products to payers. Other service providers have the same goal, with CROs in particular showing an appetite for acquiring outcomes businesses.

OutcomesMiner's strengths stem from the combination of Deloitte and Intermountain Healthcare. The product is underpinned by the repository of EHRs accumulated by Intermountain, a network of 22 hospitals and 185 clinics. Intermountain began using computers in the 1970s and as such is sitting on a wealth of healthcare data, both clinical and financial. In February, Deloitte inked a 5-year alliance with Intermountain and gave a vague outline for its plans to improve the use of Big Data analytics in healthcare. OutcomesMiner is the first concrete evidence of how Deloitte will work with Intermountain to achieve this lofty goal. As well as providing the EHRs, Intermountain is supporting the alliance with the 70-person analytics team it runs to enable evidence-based clinical decisionmaking.

- here's the Deloitte release

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